Dog BackpacksLearn how to choose the right backpack for your hiking buddy!

The Proper Function

The Perfect Fit

Wyatt is a jovial and extroverted dog who loves comfort during a hard day’s work! He enjoy’s a well fitted backpack that is fully adjustable with both chest and girth straps. He recommends finding a pack with padded girth straps, this provides additional comfort when your dog needs lifting over water, boulders and other various obstacles. Removable saddle bags are also important as you may need to remove weight from your dog during water crossings, boulder hopping or start to notice fatigue. I would avoid velcro straps, they tend to wear over-time and will separate should the pack get got on a branch or other debris. Internal straps within the saddle bag is key as this helps secure all items while keeping the weight evenly distributed.

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Hot Dogs

Wyatt loves orange  – don’t ask me how I know this! Wyatt won’t admit it, but his prey instinct has caused him to chase down a few rabbits leaving him separated from his dad. With bright colors, it makes it easier to help locate your dog should you get separated. Reflective strips are important and can be vital at nighttime and make you both more visible during neighborhood walks.

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Wyatt’s Backpack

Wyatt loves his Kurgo Max Pack! This backpack typically accommodates breeds up to 110 lbs and is excellent for hiking,  backpacking, walks and trail runs. It is made with water resistant material and sports Wyatts favorite color with two reflective strips. This dog backpack is extremely adjustable with eight different adjustment points to ensure a comfy fit. Wyatt wants to remind you that you consult your vet on how to choose the best backpack for your dog. As a general rule of paw, 10% to 12% of their body weight is a good starting point. Wyatt weighs 60 lbs, so his pack should not exceed 6 lbs in weight.

“Buck was neither a house-dog nor kennel-dog. The whole realm was his.” – Call of the Wild 

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 Start conditioning your dog with an empty dog backpack and gradually overtime begin to add weight. Give your buddy time to adjust to the new weight and develop the muscle strength to handle it before hitting the trail. Generally, a 15-minute walk with a weighted backpack is similar to a 30-minute walk without out it.

In Summary

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Once you hit the trail, be sure to have everything you need. No matter how long the hike, you need to bring plenty of food and water. Products like Gulpy, Kibble Carrier and Collapse A Bowl work great to keep your dog hydrated and energized. Stop frequently and be sure to observe your dog for signs of heat exhaustion and fatigue. Wyatt wishes every ‘Happy Trails’ while engaging in The Proper Function!

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TPF

Dan is an explorer for The Outbound and founder of The Proper Function, an outdoor editorial. He is passionate about exploration and can’t stay put for more than a week.